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ORLANDO, Fla. – A doctor’s sneakers have become a symbol of resilience, weeks after the Orlando nightclub shooting.

Senior resident Dr. Joshua Corsa with the Orlando Regional Medical Center is still wearing the blood stained shoes he wore the night of he Pulse massacre.

Just after the June 12 shooting, Corsa posted a heartbreaking Facebook status, along with a photo of his bloody shoes. He helped treat some of the 100+ victims who were shot when a gunman opened fire inside the nightclub.

“This blood, which poured out of those patients and soaked through my scrubs and shoes, will stain me forever,” Corsa wrote in the post. “In these Rorschach patterns of red I will forever see their faces and the faces of those that gave everything they had in those dark hours.”

49 victims died from their injuries.

Listen to the emotional moment Corsa read his viral Facebook post on NPR

Most patients were discharged a few weeks after the shooting. According to the Associated Press, one victim still remains in critical condition.

In the post, Corsa vowed to wear the shoes until the last patient is discharged. Then, he says, he will display them in his office as a reminder of that night’s tragedy.

“I want to see them in front of me every time I go to work. For on June 12, after the worst of humanity reared its evil head, I saw the best of humanity … come fighting right back. I never want to forget that night,” wrote Corsa.

He says he hopes the last patient will be discharged soon.

“I’m optimistic that [the patient] will get better I don’t have to wear them for too much longer,” Corsa told the Orlando Sentinel.

Read Corsa’s full Facebook post below:

“These are my work shoes from Saturday night. They are brand new, not even a week old. I came to work this morning and saw these in the corner [of] my call room, next to the pile of dirty scrubs.

I had forgotten about them until now. On these shoes, soaked between its fibers, is the blood of 54 innocent human beings. I don’t know which were straight, which were gay, which were black, or which were Hispanic.

What I do know is that they came to us in wave upon wave of suffering, screaming, and death. And somehow, in that chaos, doctors, nurses, technicians, police, paramedics, and others, performed super-human feats of compassion and care.

This blood, which poured out of those patients and soaked through my scrubs and shoes, will stain me forever. In these Rorschach patterns of red I will forever see their faces and the faces of those that gave everything they had in those dark hours.

There is still an enormous amount of work to be done. Some of that work will never end. And while I work I will continue to wear these shoes. And when the last patient leaves our hospital, I will take them off, and I will keep them in my office.

I want to see them in front of me every time I go to work.

For on June 12, after the worst of humanity reared its evil head, I saw the best of humanity … come fighting right back. I never want to forget that night.”